Northern Manuscripts

Life under the diamond air of the North

New Release: Scatter my Ashes

Remembering Mabel Brewster, an amazing lady as wild and true as Canada’s wilderness.

Release time: December 10th, 2019

Elisabeth Weigand

Born and raised in Germany, Elisabeth Weigand started travelling the world at an early age.

During her abundant visits to many parts of this globe, she discovered Canada and decided in 1993 to make this wonderful country her future home. Elisabeth moved right into the Yukon, the most north-western territory Canada’s.

She lives on a rural acreage with her horses and dog, only minutes away from the mighty Yukon River.

Her travel adventures in Canada’s North were made into literature: Yukon River canoeing, remote cabin life and horse adventures in the Yukon await you in her spellbinding memoirs.

Available Now

Scatter my Ashes on the Fields Up Top

Elisabeth Weigand’s heart-wrenching tribute to the life of Mabel Brewster (1935-2015), whom she met upon her immigration to Canada’s Yukon Territory in 1993.  This memoir is a stunning retelling of her life in the remote north that is at once spellbinding, light-hearted, beautiful, and heartbreaking, the reader is transported to the last untamed frontier—where nature reigns supreme and true friendship never dies.

This is a magnificent manuscript, radiating with beauty, passion, humour, and positive life energy.
A masterful accomplishment—well done.
FriesenPress

Yukon

Yukon is the smallest and westernmost of Canada’s three federal territories, with a population of 40,369 people (2019) and its capital Whitehorse lovingly called “The Wilderness City”.

At 5,959 m (19,551 ft), Yukon’s Mount Logan, in Kluane National Park and Reserve, is the highest mountain in Canada and the second-highest on the North American continent. Most of Yukon has a subarctic climate, characterized by long cold winters and brief warm summers. The Arctic Ocean coast has a tundra climate.

Notable rivers include the Yukon River, as well as the Pelly, Stewart, Peel, White, and Tatshenshini rivers.